By Craig Ritchie

A two-day superyacht conference and show scheduled for May 2014 aims to put North America’s Pacific Northwest on the global superyachting map.

The Pacific Yacht Conference, to be hosted in Vancouver, British Columbia from May 28-29 aboard the harbour cruise vessel M/V Magic Charm, will “provide the region’s yacht builders, refitters, designers, brokers, marinas and service providers with the ideal forum for tackling issues and facilitating growth in their industry,” says Lorna Titley, director at conference organiser Quaynote Communications.

“We have chosen Vancouver as the host city to reflect its potential as a superyacht hub and destination. It is an ideal stopping point for superyachts cruising along the unique Pacific Northwest coastline towards Alaska, as well as home to a growing community of high net-worth individuals relocating from Asia, who represent a key market of prospective superyacht owners.”

The event is expected to attract a who’s-who of yacht owners, captains, yacht builders, designers, naval architects, brokers, managers, financiers, marina operators and yacht provisioners.

The conference agenda includes discussions on pilotage and regulatory issues, marina demand and supply in the Pacific Northwest, cruising opportunities, superyacht build and design, and service facilities for larger yachts in the region.

Confirmed conference speakers include Sara Anghel, executive director of the National Marine Manufacturer’s Association Canada; Mark Drewelow, owner of C2C and founder of Yacht Aid Global; Fred Laughlan, marine sales manager-Canada at Volvo Penta Canada; Pat Bray of Bray Yacht Design and Research; Frederick Robinson of Carney Badley Spellman; John Nassichuk, general manager of Raven Marine; Steve Jackman of North Island Marina; and Robert Ruzzi of Offshore Interiors.

A full conference agenda is available online by clicking here.

 

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